Sunday, June 25, 2017
Login  |  Register
 
 
 
You are here :: Services Offered » Foster Care Program » Foster Care News
 
St Louis Region  
 
Foster Parent Events  
  Today  View Date: 

MayJune 2017July
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

 
Documents  
 
Links  
 
Parenting Support  

Q: I understand many of the Beyond Consequences principles and the idea of relationship-based parenting resonates with my heart. However, could you please explain more about why I should see my child's issues as "regulatory" instead of "behavioral" and the neuroscience that supports this concept?
 
A: Yes, I often say, "A child's issues are not behavioral, they are regulatory," because we need to parent children at the level of regulation and relationship. This is imperative, especially with a child who experienced childhood trauma, because we can then more deeply address the critical forces within this child that operate at implicit levels, beyond the exchanges of language, choices, stars, and sticker charts.

Learn More....

 
Information for Foster Parents - Very Beneficial  

Washington University - St Louis - NEWSROOM

Article By Jim Dryden

Mom’s love good for child’s brain

http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/23329.aspx

 
Child & Adult Reactions to Trauma  
Children's Reaction to Trauma: Suggestions for Parents
Your Reaction to Trauma: Suggestions for Teens
 
Respite Ideas  

Deb's Top Ten Sneaky Respite Ideas: 

10. Be moved by the Spirit. Sit through two church services while your kids are in the nursery.  

9. Use your Gym Membership. Work out. Or, use the Hot Tub. Just make sure you use the maximum allotted child care time. (For Lifetime, that’s 2 hours. And, yes, they keep track.)

8. Is after school suspension REALLY that bad??

7. Drop them off at karate/dance/scouts/piano lessons. Sleep in car. Don’t forget to set your portable alarm clock.

6. Attend an ECFE class and let your child play. You may get a “talking to” later when they find you snoring in the play tent. It’s a risk worth taking.

5. Have an afternoon lunch at McDonald’s Playland. Eat slowly. Very slowly. Bring earplugs and a good book. Remember, refills are free.

4. Ask for a “Wimpy” Playdate. “I will gladly take your kids on Tuesday, if you take mine today.”

3. Give REALLY GOOD kid birthday presents, so that your kid gets invited to LOTS of parties. Slumber parties are a bonus.

2. When Gramma and Grampa visit, just step out for a “quick” errand. Wink, wink. Note: This only works once. Use wisely. This may be repeated on other, unsuspecting relatives.

1. Sign your kids up for Vacation Bible School. All of them. The Lutherans, the Methodists, the Presbyterians……  

 
Foster Facts  

On any given day in North America, more than 500,000 children are in the foster care system, and nearly 145,000 of them are available for adoption, just waiting for the right family to find them.

 *There are 423,773 children in the U.S. foster care system; 114,556 of these children are available for adoption. Their birth parent's legal rights have been permanently terminated and children are left without a family. 

 *More children become available for adoption each year than are adopted. In 2009, 69,947 children had parental rights terminated by the courts, yet only 57,466 were adopted. 

 *Children often wait three years or more to be adopted, move three or more times in foster care and often are separated from siblings. The average age of waiting children is 8 years old.

*Last year, 29,471 children turned 18 and left the foster care system without an adoptive family.
 
*Adopting from foster care is affordable. Most child welfare agencies cover the costs of home studies and court fees, and provide post-adoption subsidies. Thousands of employers offer financial reimbursement and paid leave for employees who adopt and Federal and/or state adoption tax credits are available to most families.
 
*Every child is adoptable. Many children in foster care have special needs. All of them deserve the chance to grow up in a safe, loving, permanent home. Support and other post-adoption resources are available. 

 *Adopting from foster care is permanent. Once a child is adopted out of foster care, the birth parents cannot attempt to claim them or fight in court for their return. A family formed through foster care adoption is forever.

 *According to a National Adoption Attitudes Survey commissioned by the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, 63 percent of Americans hold a favorable view of adoption and 78 percent think more should be done to encourage adoption. 

 *Nearly 40 percent of American adults, or 81.5 million people, have considered adopting a child, according to the National Adoption Attitudes Survey. If just one in 500 of these adults adopted, every waiting child in foster care would have a permanent family.

 
 
Foster Care News | How to become a licensed foster parent | Foster Parent Home Page
Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use
 
Copyright (c) 2017 Missouri Alliance